Netflix will be officially asked to add a disclaimer to The Crown, clarifying the series is a work of fiction.

“It’s a beautifully produced work of fiction, so as with other TV productions, Netflix should be very clear at the beginning it is just that,” Britain’s culture secretary Oliver Dowden said.

“Without this, I fear a generation of viewers who did not live through these events may mistake fiction for fact.”

It follows ongoing outrage around of Peter Morgan’s script of dramatised events, particularly the current season which takes place largely in the 1980s.

Princess Diana’s brother, Charles Spencer, has said, “Americans tell me they have watched The Crown as if they have taken a history lesson. Well, they haven’t.

“It is very hard, there is a lot of conjecture and a lot of invention, isn’t there? You can hang it on fact but the bits in between are not fact.”

Last week, the ABC fact-checked dialogue attributed to Bob Hawke on a Four Corners episode.

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Played by Richard Roxburgh, ‘Hawkie’ describes the Queen as an “unelected non-Australian, who lives on the other side of the world, and for all good intentions, is a different breed.”

“You wouldn’t put a pig in charge of a herd of prime beef cut even it did look good in a twin set and pearls.”

Not only was the 1983 interview recreated on the wrong day in the wrong city, Hawke never made the ‘pig’ comment.

Doubt is also cast over the scene where Lord Mountbatten writes a letter to a young Prince Charles, something that Morgan literally made up in his head.

“What we know is that Mountbatten was really responsible for taking Charles to one side at precisely this point and saying, ‘Look, you know, enough already with playing the field. It’s time you got married and it’s time you provided an heir,’” he said.

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“I think everything that’s in the letter that Mountbatten writes to Charles is what I really believe — you know, based on everything I’ve read and people I’ve spoken to, that that represents his view.

“We will never know if it was put into a letter, and we will never know if Charles got that letter before or after Mountbatten’s death but in this particular drama, this is how I decided to deal with it,” he added.

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